Abstract: 

A peer network to share, generate and mobilize knowledge to strengthen organizational capacity was developed by the Arts Council of Sault Ste. Marie; Conseil des Arts de Hearst; and 4elements Living Arts on Manitoulin Island.  This project was funded by the Ontario Arts Council’s Compass Grant for increasing organizational capacity, and was facilitated by NORDIK Institute.  The project led to a strengthening of the organizations’ management capacity; provided the time and space necessary to initiate an internal dialogue within each organization, as well as a dialogue with community members and mentoring partners; and an improvement in a variety of organizational aspects, strengthening these capacities within the cultural sector.

It was suggested that the peer mentoring process could be used as a model for building sustainability throughout the region as it established critical support through dialogue, share resources and knowledge mobilization in a region that is challenged by geographical distances and contextual differences to southern Ontario.

Project Team: 

Jude Ortiz, Meghan Ableson, Dr. Gayle Broad

Dates: 

2012-2013

Publications: 

Abstract: 

The Metis Nation of Ontario’s Education and Training department delivers numerous services to the Metis population residing in Ontario.  This department is also responsible to deliver services and programs that aid Metis citizens in the area of employment, education and training opportunities including financial resources, skill development and programming. 

NORDIK Institute delivered and developed an Asset Map report that displayed the education and skill levels of the Métis citizen workforce in Ontario for the Métis Nation of Ontario’s Education and Training department, which is responsible for delivering employment, education and training opportunities for Métis citizens.  While Metis people attempting to access the labour market are faced with numerous barriers and challenges, they possess significant assets. The report highlighted assets such as a strong sense of culture and identity of Metis people themselves, who bring together a unique set of skills, connection to the land, traditional knowledge and a vital culture that Métis people bring with them as they enter the workplace, whether as wage-earners, or as self-employed entrepreneurs. These assets can be enhanced and/or extended to build a stronger foundation for an even stronger and more diverse robust labour force participation for among Metis Métis people.

Project Team: 

Dr. Gayle Broad, Lauren Doxtater, Connie Manitowabi

Dates: 

2016

Publications: 

Asset Mapping Report – Labour Market Skills, Education and Employment Experience

 

Abstract:

In partnership with an Indigenous Youth Council, NORDIK has developed the innovative Indigenous Youth Lead Youth Anti-Racism Program. This important initiative is intended to empower youth leaders to deliver culturally safe, Indigenous-focused anti-racism workshops in school and community settings. The objective of this program is to promote understanding and a shared responsibility in creating respectful community relationships with all youth in Ontario.

The Indigenous Youth Lead Youth Anti-Racism Program will help promote understanding and shared responsibility to create respectful community relationships with all youth in Ontario. It is designed to engage non-Indigenous youth through interactive, age-appropriate workshops in elementary schools, high schools, post-secondary schools and other community settings.

Discussions on race and ethnicity are personal. Many choose not to share experiences due to traumatic events and can find it challenging to explain the interconnected nature of racism. For Indigenous Peoples, the legacies of Residential schools, implications of the Treaty-making process and negative stereotypes all play a role in their experiences today.

In these workshops, participants discuss the negative impacts of racism and biases on First Nations, Inuit and Métis people in a culturally safe, supported environment. Youth participants learn about the importance of building respectful intercultural relationships and dialogue.

The program was designed with input from First Nations, Métis and Inuit youth and elders. Funding for the development of the program was provided by the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Affairs.

This flexible program includes six 90-minute workshop modules that can be tailored to suit the grade level of the intended audience. A training materials are also available. Facilitators can choose to run some or all of the modules:

The beautiful, unique artwork that accompanies the Program materials was created by Patrick Hunter: https://www.patrickhunter.ca

Download the Training Guide and Workshop Package in English or French.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

NORDIK would like to thank the following people for their important contributions to this program:

The Indigenous youth and Elders who comprised the Youth Advisory Circle, the students and staff of Pelican Falls High School, Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School, and Keewaytinook Okimakanak Secondary School for hosting the Youth Advisory Circle and providing feedback on the program, and the Métis Nation of Ontario for reviewing content.

DISCLAIMER

The Indigenous Youth Leading Youth Training Guide and Workshop Package have been developed by the NORDIK Institute and were funded by the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Affairs. The views expressed in the Training Guide do not necessarily represent the views of the Government of Ontario.

Project Team:

Lauren Doxtater, April Wesley, Zach Low, Sean Meades

Abstract: 

A toolkit for strengths-based approach to strategic planning, encouraging participants to draw on their knowledge and understanding of their own community to identify assets that can be leveraged towards future vitality and success. Inspired by the medicine wheel’s four directions, the toolkit prompts the exploration of Where do we want to go?, What is our vision?, How are we going to get there?, and Act – Doing it. The completed toolkit has guided the progress and development of strategic planning for many Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities and organizations throughout Northern Ontario in their partnering work with NORDIK Institute. 

Project Team: 

Jude Ortiz, Dr. Gayle Broad, Libby Bobiwash

Dates: 

2005

Publication: 

Community Strategic Planning ToolkitDownload

Abstract: 

The Community Engagement Toolkit was developed as an application to facilitate citizen participation and involvement, whether by community groups, researchers, local governments or others across a variety of platforms. This toolkit uses an inclusive approach outlines four steps in the community engagement process – getting started, activities, reporting and next steps. These are organized around the four directions of the medicine wheel; (east) meet; (south) build trust; (west) identify issues; and, (north) develop solutions that incorporates and respects Indigenous and local knowledge. While the toolkit was developed for Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, it has since been applied to many aboriginal Indigenous and non-aboriginal Indigenous organizations and communities throughout Northern Ontario.

Project Team:

Jude Ortiz, Dr. Gayle Broad

Dates:

2005

Publication: