Abstract: 

This research pilot began in the winter of 2014 to investigate urban beekeeping in the context of Sault Ste. Marie.  The pilot project set out to assess the feasibility of an established, successful, working apiary within the city by fostering positive community relations; continual operation and/or expansion of bee colonies in the community; gathering a baseline of public perception of urban beekeeping; and the ability of public outreach and education in addressing community perceptions.

Dates: 

2014-2015

Project Team: 

Laura Wyper

Abstract: 

Urban Indigenous Youth for Change is a collaborative project focused on urban Indigenous youth aged 13 – 35 to embrace their role as change makers in their communities. 

UIYFC supports youth in co-creating a path of opportunity for themselves and others by becoming aware, engaged and informed of the social economy sector. The project creates opportunities for Indigenous youth to learn and teach one another – bringing together Indigenous culture, land based knowledge and entrepreneurship skills. UIYFC works to engage urban Indigenous youth by connecting young change makers with peers, elders and knowledge keepers and community organizations. The youth-led UIYFC steering committee collaborates by focusing on strengths to create a better future for youth. 

Dates:

2015-Present

Project Team:

Jordan Tabobondung, Kristia Bissiallon, Lauren Doxtater, Rebecca Commanda, Samantha Kyle, Taylor Jolin

Abstract: 

Soup Ste. Marie is a public dinner designed to use community-driven financial support to democratically fund projects led by individuals, businesses and groups of community members.  It is a recurring micro-grant model based on the international Sunday Soup program which uses crowd sourcing to finance creative projects through community meals.  This years’ theme was “Engaging Indigenous Youth.”  UIYFC were the lead organizers for the event supported by NORDIK Institute, Social Entrepreneurship Evolution and YouLaunch.  Marek McLeod won over $400 to deliver youth paint nights where he would teach arts-based skills to create painting based on elder’s teachings.

Dates: 

2013 – Ongoing

Project Team:

Elizabeth MacMillan, Rebecca Commanda, Katie Blundt, Jamie McIntyre

Links: 

https://www.facebook.com/events/539005459500908/

Abstract:

Dates: 

2012-2014

Researchers: 

Publications: 

Links: 

Serpent River First Nation Sustainable DevelopmentDownload

Abstract: 

Social Enterprise for Northern Ontario (SENO) CoStarter for Change supports the development of early-stage, high growth social enterprises in Northern Ontario by offering social entrepreneurs access to capital, educational and support programs, workspace, and other services to help launch and grow their non-profit and for-profit ventures. In 2013, Ontario launched the Social Enterprise Strategy (https://www.ontario.ca/page/ontarios-social-enterprise-strategy-2016-2021).  The  Social Enterprise Demonstration Fund (SEDF) (program closed) is one of the key commitments to the strategy, supporting 11 social finance projects throughout the province.  A $4 million contribution has leveraged $6 million in private investment.  Social Enterprise Northern Ontario (SENO) a collaboration led by PARO Centre for Women’s Enterprise is one of the successful social finance projects, receiving $250,000 for two years.

If you are interested in applying for the SENO CoStarter for Change program, please download the Application package, the Required criteria and milestones toolkit and the Self-assessment toolkit.

Project Team: 

Elizabeth Macmillan, Zach Falldien

Links: 

Social Enterprise Demonstration Fund (SEDF)

Social Enterprise Northern Ontario (SENO)

PARO Centre for Women’s Enterprise

Application package

Required criteria and milestones toolkit

Self-assessment toolkit

Abstract: 

Social Entrepreneurship Evolution (SEE) is an emergent pan-northern collaborative whose focus is to support the infrastructure for Youth Social Entrepreneurship (YSE) with an emphasis on collaboration, shared measurement and collective impact.  Lead by NORDIK Institute and its various regional partners, this project focuses on building a sustainable network by providing supports, setting up connections, sharing resources, building capacities, engaging youth, using community based research methods, and promoting social entrepreneurship and the benefits it can bring to Northern Ontario.  SEE has initiated a number of programs including Urban Indigenous Youth for Change, SENO CoStarter for Change, as well as leading a  nine-week free workshop series, open to all, to learn  about Social Enterprise, Entrepreneurship, and business basics, and how to begin a business that can help solve community problems.

Project Team: 

Katie Elliott, Shannon Moan, Melanie Watson, Dr. Gayle Broad, Erika Luoma, Katie Blunt, Elizabeth MacMillan, Jamie McIntyre, Jordan Wettlaufer

Links: 

Social Entrepreneurship Evolution (SEE) 

Sign up for our updates and get involved with the movement of social innovation and entrepreneurship by heading over to our website seethechange.ca

For more frequent updates, follow our Facebook page and Twitter handle for news and alerts from the movement on a regular basis.

Abstract: 

The Rural Agri-Innovation Network (RAIN) is began as a project of Sault Ste. Marie Innovation Centre and NORDIK Institute, with support from farmers and communities to enhance the agriculture and food sector in Algoma.  RAIN’s vision is to build a resilient farm and food sector in northern Ontario through innovative research and agriculture development projects. To date RAIN has conducted research in Forage Improvement, Novel Crop Studies, Value Chain Development; and has developed programs such as the SNAPP (Sustainable New Agri-Food Products & Productivity) Program, and the Regional Tile Drainage and Land Clearing Program, to name a few.  

Project Team: 

Dr. Gayle Broad, Errol Caldwell, David Thompson, Mikala Parr, Melissa Watson, Jordan Danielewicz, Jessica Laidley

Dates:

Present

Links: 

For more information please visit RAIN’s website at http://rainalgoma.ca/ and follow their blog at http://rainalgoma.ca/home-2/blog/

Follow RAIN on twitter @RAINAlgoma

Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/rainalgoma
YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChowRsaQQgh2YppqMb25-pA

Abstract:

Northern Ontarians have spent most of the 21st century concerned about our region’s declining population, which due to a combination of outmigration and declining birth rates has either declined or been relatively stagnant since the late 1990s. While these declines are somewhat offset by the population growth in Indigenous communities throughout the region, if this demographic trend does not reverse itself, Northern Ontario will lack the human resources to fill local labour market needs and the regional tax base will continue to shrink, resulting in a region that is less productive, economically less active, and risks further decline.

The RNIP has two primary objectives: retaining existing immigrants and attracting new immigrants to the region. The program is an adaptation of Canada’s point-based immigration system, where an applicant will require 70 points to be eligible to apply for permanent residency.

Project Team:

Dr. Nusrate Aziz & Sean Meades

Date:

2020

Publication:

 

Abstract: 

A toolkit for strengths-based approach to strategic planning, encouraging participants to draw on their knowledge and understanding of their own community to identify assets that can be leveraged towards future vitality and success. Inspired by the medicine wheel’s four directions, the toolkit prompts the exploration of Where do we want to go?, What is our vision?, How are we going to get there?, and Act – Doing it. The completed toolkit has guided the progress and development of strategic planning for many Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities and organizations throughout Northern Ontario in their partnering work with NORDIK Institute. 

Project Team: 

Jude Ortiz, Dr. Gayle Broad, Libby Bobiwash

Dates: 

2005

Publication: 

Community Strategic Planning ToolkitDownload

Abstract: 

The Community Engagement Toolkit was developed as an application to facilitate citizen participation and involvement, whether by community groups, researchers, local governments or others across a variety of platforms. This toolkit uses an inclusive approach outlines four steps in the community engagement process – getting started, activities, reporting and next steps. These are organized around the four directions of the medicine wheel; (east) meet; (south) build trust; (west) identify issues; and, (north) develop solutions that incorporates and respects Indigenous and local knowledge. While the toolkit was developed for Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, it has since been applied to many aboriginal Indigenous and non-aboriginal Indigenous organizations and communities throughout Northern Ontario.

Project Team:

Jude Ortiz, Dr. Gayle Broad

Dates:

2005

Publication: