Abstract: 

The Neighbourhood Resource Centre (NRC) located on Gore Street in Sault Ste. Marie, provides person-centred and accessible services, for a wide variety of needs, and a safe space for socialization.  Agencies through the NRC, work collaboratively, respond quickly and create opportunity for connection with community members accessing the Centre.  However, The research demonstrated deficits in awareness of the specific services and /agencies attending the NRC and the need to improve deliberate, on-going outreach needs to be improved upon.  Perceptions of the police presence was also a concern and community member/business relationships will need more time and effort to improve.

Researchers: 

Lauren Doxtater, Dr. Gayle Broad

Dates:

2015

Publications: 

Abstract: 

Through partnership with Edith Orr, manager of the Johnson Township Farmers’ Market, and the Algoma Food Network, NORDIK examined the flow of local food into the Sault Ste. Marie marketplace.  A directory and map of businesses that report sourcing local (to the Algoma District) food (local food meaning any product harvested or raised in the Algoma District) was developed.

Researchers: 

David Thompson and Nairne Cameron

Dates: 

2012

Links: 

Local Food Retail MapDownload

Abstract: 

In May 2003, the Community Economic and Social Development (CESD) program of Algoma University undertook a study of the non-profit sector in Sault Ste. Marie, to determine its contribution to the overall economy of the City. The study explored In order to determine what contribution the non-profits were making to the economy, the areas of revenue generation and disbursement; direct and indirect job creation; community capacity building through volunteer and staff development; and social capital development were explored.  The study indicated that in In addition to the significant contributions to the City’s economy and concrete jobs created job creation, the non-profit sector provides substantial contributions to the quality of life of Sault Ste. Marie’s citizens. Findings indicate and t that this sector of Sault Ste. Marie’s economy could be grown through strategic investment. 

Researchers:

Dr. Gayle Broad, Steffanie Date 

Dates: 

2003-2004

Publication: 

Abstract: 

In 2011, the Algoma Sheep and Lamb Association approached NORDIK to explore marketing opportunities for local lamb and chevon (meat goat) products.  Market analysis for lamb and goat products in the Algoma District was desired by the Algoma Sheep and Lamb Producers Association, in order to determine the feasibility of a market-based co-operative for lamb and goat producers in the Algoma District.  Recommendations outlined how the group can realize opportunities and mitigate threats as producers continued to serve this market

Researchers:

Broderick Causley, David Thompson 

Dates: 

2011-2012

Publication: 

Buy Local Lamb and Chevon Market Research ReportDownload

Links:

Exploring Market Opportunities for Lamb and Chevron in AlgomaDownload

Locally Grown Food for the Northern Urban Marketplace (2012)

Local Food Retail MapDownload

Abstract:

This action research joined the experiences and opinions of residents, business or and property owners, service providers and other diverse stakeholders towards the building of a vibrant, economically healthy downtown district in Sault Ste. Marie. Over the period of one year, more than 1000 participants, passionate about the future of the city’s downtown core, drew attention to its strengths, potential, and areas for improvement. Among the projects that emerged from this work are the Graffiti Reframed project and the Neighbourhood Resource Centre. Of the many valuable partnerships that contributed to this research, the SSMPS provided the much-needed backbone support to the large-scale change envisioned by the participants in the Downtown Dialogue in Action project. It recommended a series of strategies to strengthen social cohesion, foster a healthy downtown economy, address the needs of “at-risk” neighbourhoods and people, and to increase access to the necessities of life, with oversight by a coordinating committee that brought together all levels of government, civil society and business. 

Researchers: 

Dr. Gayle Broad, Sean Meades, Tom Green, Dana Chalifoux, Jessica Bolduc 

Dates: 

2011-20142

Publication: 

Abstract:

The link between culture and the development of healthy, resilient communities is gathering strength in Northern Ontario. This research brought forward a new framework for approaching economic development that places a healthy culture, one that provides a supportive environment for people and their expressions of creativity, at the forefront of a vibrant and economically sound community. By assessing the socio-economic impact of the arts on the economy of Sault Ste. Marie, this study identified local strengths that can bolster the economy. These include community ownership and commitment, increasing economic activities and efficiencies around industry clusters and building on the existing arts economy. The findings point to the potential for increased economic activity where a greater understanding and strategic development planning process is generated. This would give the city a competitive advantage in attracting new business, retaining skilled labour and investment and providing wide-spread community benefits. 

Researchers:

Jude Ortiz, Dr. Gayle Broad

Dates:

2005 – 2007

Publication: 

Culture Creativity and the ArtsDownload

Abstract:

Community Supported Agriculture is an alternative,  and locally-rooted model of agriculture and food distribution that develops a network of individuals who have pledged to support one or more farms, with growers and consumers sharing the risks and benefits of farming good food.

Researchers:

Cecelia Fernandez

Dates:

2006

Publications:

TBD

Abstract: 

In response to earlier economic decline, this community-based initiative assessed Sault Ste. Marie’s resilience across sectors and explored community planning strategies to increase the city’s desirability and sustainability by becoming more economically viable, socially equitable, environmentally responsible and culturally viable. Community Resilience has since become a movement, seeing Sault Ste. Marie becoming the first community in Canada with a population larger than 10,000 to implement a Community Resilience project, and more recently adopting a community resilience framework in the 2016 Community Adjustment Committee process.

Researchers: 

Jude Ortiz, Dr. Linda Savory-Gordon

Dates: 

2003 – 20011 

Publication: 

Abstract: 

This research demonstrated the benefits of the cooperative model for expanding locally sourced beef markets in Northern Ontario and support regional agricultural economies experiencing crises sparked by globalization through strengthening stakeholders. By examining existing Northern Ontario cooperatives and place-based businesses that support a value chain for local beef, researchers explored the impacts of scale, regulations, markets and infrastructure to the successes of these operations. 

Researcher: 

David Thompson

Dates: 

2012

Publication: 

Expanding Locally Sourced Beef in Northern Ontario through the Co-operative ModelDownload

Abstract:

ASOPRICOR is the Association for the Holistic Development of Rural and Urban Communities, a community organization that represents many rural organizations, co-operatives and  communities in rural Cundinimarca, Colombia. This project studied the sustainable development initiatives in rural Columbia, including agriculture, social enterprise and women’s organizations. Researchers from Algoma University collaborated with the Columbian association ASOPRICOR to exchange knowledge and experiences of rural communities, cooperatives and organizations between North and South. The research stemmed from a knowledge exchange between ASOPRICOR and the CESD program at then Algoma University College, The goal of which was to share information and knowledge with the hope that it will be a source of inspiration, reflection and questions about the daily work of community development in both the global South and North.

Dates:

2005 – 2010

Researchers: 

Jose Agustin Reyes, Maria Eva Bergaño, Dr. Gayle Broad

Publication:

Recovery of the Collective Memory and Projection of the Future ReportDownload